In its fifth year, The Olde Depot JUNKtion offers one-of-a-kind décor for every home

WRITTEN BY JODIE TWEED | PHOTOGRAPHED BY SAVANNA SMITH

CREATIVITY HAS NO LIMITS. This is even more evident when you step into the Northern Pacific Event Center during Memorial Day weekend. Old gasoline cans are transformed into metal pigs and dogs. An old chicken feeder becomes a long plate rack in the center of a large farm table.

What is going on here?

P.J. Overvold (left), an Amy and Brad Johnson are event organizers for The Olde Depot JUNKtion.

If you can’t pull yourself away from HGTV design show marathons, The Olde Depot JUNKtion is something you just can’t miss.  Whether you prefer a rustic, shabby chic, farmhouse or industrial look, or you wish to find “junk” to repurpose yourself, The Olde Depot JUNKtion has something that would fit right in. Last year the annual event drew fifty-seven antique vendors set up in one hundred booths which packed the 28,000-square-foot building. Most of the items for sale were vintage items, including furniture that have been repurposed, reclaimed or upcycled for your home or cabin.

The event is organized by P.J. Overvold, owner of The Red Umbrella in Nisswa, and Brad and Amy Johnson, owners of Second Hand Rose in Buffalo.

“Everything here is handcrafted and made with love,” explains Amy. “Nobody wants anything to match. They want something unique and one-of-a-kind.”

“They want something different that their neighbors don’t have,” adds her husband, Brad.

The Olde Depot JUNKtion draws about 4,000 to 5,000 visitors during the two-day event.

“It’s crazy, as word gets out, it keeps getting bigger and bigger,” says Amy. “We’re proud we bring a lot of people into the town of Brainerd.”

Brad says he and Amy go to many auctions and estate sales, regular “junkers” who are reminiscent of Redd Foxx’s junk dealer character on “Sanford and Son.”

“The biggest reason we got into this is to be home with our kids,” he adds. “We really like the hunt for finding something different.”

The couple repurposed an old Southern tobacco press into a wine bar.


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